1. Uplifting novels, YA trilogies, and more.

    Our first Ask a Book Buyer of the new year.

     
  2. thetinhouse:

    A very happy Cari Luna @ Powell’s City of Books! 

    AWWWWWW.

     

  3. Five books related to the young adults in your life, and the issues they care about:


    Does Jesus Really Love Me?: A Gay Christian’s Pilgrimage in Search of God in America by Jeff Chu
    This is one of the most important books I’ve read recently. It’s about being gay and Christian in America, by one of the most intelligent, sensitive, unflinching, and gifted writers around. It gets to the heart of one of the most difficult conversations we need to have in this country about sexual identity and faith — a topic that is a huge concern to so many of the college students I meet around the U.S., and to me, too.

    Feed by M. T. Anderson
    If you have not read this novel, you are depriving yourself of one of the most chilling portraits of the potential negative effects of technology and its relationship to consumer culture ever written. It is more than a must. It’s practically prophetic. The author is absolutely brilliant, and he’s been awarded with more than one National Book Award nomination for his ability to weave that brilliance into a compelling novel that gets to the heart of some of the most important and difficult topics that face us today — and does so fearlessly.

    Soul Searching: The Religious and Spiritual Lives of American Teenagers by Christian Smith
    Yes, it’s a publication of findings from a major study so, no, it’s not the easiest read, but it’s really good stuff. It provides super-excellent research on attitudes about faith and spirituality among young adults in America, and I recommend it highly. Whether or not the young adults in your life admit it openly, they care deeply about spirituality and religion, and it’s important to pay attention to this subject in their lives.

    Female Chauvinist Pigs: Women and the Rise of Raunch Culture by Ariel Levy
    A must-read in thinking about gender, girls, women, and the state of “feminism” today — as it’s been hijacked by people who don’t know a thing about feminism. Levy’s writing is courageous and smart, and she gets to the heart of one of the depressing realities of today’s girls and women — that somehow, what Levy calls “raunch” has come to be associated as “feminist” — and wrongly so.

    Hooking Up: Sex, Dating, and Relationships on Campus by Kathleen A. Bogle
    This is an excellent introduction to hooking up — what it is, and how it shows up on college campuses today — by a top-notch sociologist, and someone who cares deeply about young people, too.

    Read the rest of our Q&A with Donna Freitas here: http://powells.us/10xq2ZV

     

  4. “I don’t know about you, but I’m kind of fed up with realism. After all, there’s enough reality already; why make more of it? Why not leave realism for the memoirs of drug addicts, the histories of salt, the biographies of porn stars? Why must we continue to read about the travails of divorced people or mildly depressed Canadians when we could be contemplating the shopping habits of zombies, or the difficulties that ensue when living and dead people marry each other? We should be demanding more stories about faery handbags and pyjamas inscribed with the diaries of strange women. We should not rest until someone writes about a television show that features the Free People’s World-Tree Library, with its elaborate waterfalls and Forbidden Books and Pirate-Magicians. We should be pining for a house haunted by rabbits.” - Kelly Link

     
  5. Let the following list of our favorite young adult novels from 2012 release your imagination into the celestial wilds, free from restraint, from convention, from parents…

    And while you’re roaming the hoary moors of moon-bathed dreamscapes, your soul awakening with a Primal Howl, remember: all titles are 20% off.

     
  6. Searching for the right gift for the young adult in your life? Dot D., graphic designer at Powell’s Books, recommends The Diviners. (Especially for fans of Downton Abbey and Buffy the Vampire Slayer.)

    “The Diviners is one of those books you can wallow in, with vintage slang peppering the dialogue in all the right places, era-specific fads criss-crossing the pages, and the sparkle and spangle of clothing styles draped all over our main characters. From the sultry Valentino to the gory H.H. Holmes, I loved catching echoes of familiar historical events tucked into a plotline of dark mysterious forces and sassy dancing girls. This story of flappers and fiends is, overall, a gloriously fun and creepy read for long rainy days.”

    Find The Diviners and more staff picks here: http://powells.us/TFuemW